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Strong associations between food-specific IgG antibodies and intestinal permeability biomarkers

A recent study published in Frontiers in Nutrition found that people with higher levels of food-specific IgG antibodies were also more likely to have increased levels of intestinal permeability biomarkers. This suggests that IgG-mediated food sensitivities may play a role in increased intestinal permeability, which can lead to a variety of health problems.


The study was conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, and involved 111 adults. The participants were tested for food-specific IgG antibodies and intestinal permeability biomarkers. The results showed that people with higher levels of food-specific IgG antibodies were more likely to have increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and anti-occludin antibodies, two biomarkers of intestinal permeability.


The researchers noted that the associations between food-specific IgG antibodies and intestinal permeability were not affected by the severity of wheat, dairy, and egg reactions. This suggests that IgG-mediated food sensitivities may play a role in increased intestinal permeability even in people who do not experience symptoms.


The findings of this study suggest that IgG-mediated food sensitivities may be a contributing factor to a variety of health problems, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and allergies. More research is needed to confirm these findings and to determine the best way to manage IgG-mediated food sensitivities.


Vita AA, Zwickey H, Bradley R. Associations between food-specific IgG antibodies and intestinal permeability biomarkers. Front Nutr. 2022 Sep 6;9:962093. doi: 10.3389/fnut.2022.962093.



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